How Poetry Influence Society

Learning How Poetry Influences Society

Poetry has developed a poor public image for those who know little of its background. As a writer who just got immersed in the vast scope of poetry, have you ever wondered if your poems will ever make an impact on society or influence them in such a way?

“Poetry lifts the veil from the hidden beauty of the world, and makes familiar objects be as if they were not familiar.”
— Percy Bysshe Shelley, from A Defence of Poetry and Other Essays.

So how else can poetry be a benefit to society? — It’s an outlet where all kinds of people can freely voice out their thoughts, provided with the liberty of expressing themselves creatively. Whether that’s a feeling of affection, frustration, hate, or at their lowest point, poetry’s strength is to meet these poets’ and readers’ emotions. It provides them a sense of belongingness.

Poems can unravel reality and self-awareness. Poems that tackle political fiascos, the world’s major dilemma or empowerment and advocacy to social rights exposes you to the reality of the writers’ shoes and their personal experiences.

Poetry is a staple venue to express beauty and feelings of love towards someone. It’s a passionate way of pulling words together to match the emotion, mood, and a rhythm is a common approach of articulating love or affection in words. It promotes motivation and inspiration for others to indulge in the art of mending words, to pursue what they love to do and even pay the favor forward by inspiring others with what they do as well.

If you came across one of the oldest poetries recorded of all time, it time-travels us to the past, giving us a glimpse of flashbacks, their ancient culture behaviors, its dynamics, and even historical events that our recent folks know little of. Margaret Fourt Goka’s collection of poetries “The Woven Flag” will give you a rerun of her day to day life and the beauty in living it to the fullest.

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